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Customize Your Google Classroom!



Wow. So much has changed in the course of just a few short weeks. Like most of you, I'm now trying to figure out how to teach my class remotely. Fortunately, I am beginning Spring Break right now so I have some time to work on it.

Like many people, when I have too much time on my hands, I tend to want to play and not work. I decided to make an effort to be somewhat productive and began to organize my Google Classroom.  While doing that, I thought it would be fun to create my own Google Classroom header images.  This caused me to have to research images sizes, converting pixels to inches, and playing around in PowerPoint. I love to create things in PowerPoint since I can use any fonts that I want, unlike Google where I'm restricted to using just Google fonts. (Google has many great font options, I just like to be different!).

I had a lot of fun creating a set of Google Classroom header images and I thought I'd share them with you!  It's just a little thing, but sometimes the little things keep you smiling, right?


Click HERE to head over to my TPT store to download your FREE header images! UPDATE! I know have added an editable option for you to customize your headers!

My only frustration with creating Google Classroom header images is that the classroom header box has a gray transparent overlay so that the class title, class code, and select theme/photo upload links stand out. I'm still happy using my pretty images rather than the generic Google options.



I even created a mini-tutorial video to show you how to easily customize your Google Classroom header.





Click HERE to head over to my TeachersPayTeachers store to download your FREE header images!

Let me know in the comments if you would like to learn how to create your OWN Google Classroom headers and I'll create another tutorial!

Stay safe and stay healthy!

Leap Day Fun!



Leap Day only comes around every four years so I like to give February 29th some special recognition in my classroom! We have some Leap Day Fun and my students read about it, write about it, math about it, and just have some fun with it too.

Four years ago, I created a reading passage with questions and a math activity all about Leap Day and Leap Year.  I've recently added some math questions, a writing activity, and a fun brainstorm activity of 29 "extra" things that students could do on the "extra" day this year.

What is Leap Day? First, I have my students read about why we have a leap day every four years. The reason ties in well with what we're learning about the relationship between the sun and the Earth in fourth grade too.

Classroom Management Makeover

At the end of each school year, I reflect back and choose one thing I really want to change and improve upon and I make that my own mini-professional development for the summer. This past summer, I chose classroom management. I've always been known for good classroom management and I've always had the ability to build good relationships with challenging students. However, in the past few years, this was getting more challenging. It could be that my patience was wearing thin (I was going through some personal challenges myself), the number of challenging students was increasing each year, the challenges were changing.  All of the above? None of the above? I couldn't put my finger on it but the reason didn't matter, if I wanted to be better at it, would have to change.

Book vs. Movie Ideas For You

In Language Arts, my students recently completed a novel unit using Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson.  I used the 5th-grade novel unit from ReadWorks.org and it was fantastic!  The unit is broken down into 22 days with lessons on genre, predictions, plot conflicts, theme, relationships, gender roles textual analysis and a ton of vocabulary resources.  It was jam-packed with great lessons and student pages and best of all, it was FREE.  I use ReadWorks.org quite frequently as a source for close reading passages but have never tried their novel units.  I highly recommend that you try it out!  They also have a nice collection of paired texts and poetry!  It's an amazing resource!

How to Use Google Forms to Make Your Teaching Life Easier!



I LOVE using Google in my classroom and over the last few years, I've found ways to use Google Forms that really help make my teaching life easier.  No matter what, I'm always overwhelmed with piles of papers to grade or to hand out - aren't we all?  Pushing out some activities, assignments, and forms to Google Forms helps me manage that overload.  I can easily pull up what I need digitally with a few clicks and it never gets LOST - I always know where to find it!

My class is not 1:1 with computers but we do have 6 desktops in the classroom that my students can use.  We also have Computer Lab as a weekly special PLUS I can reserve a lab or a class set of laptops during the school day if I want my whole class to complete a Google Form all at the same time. I usually just use Forms in my classroom and rotate my students to a computer station in groups of 6.

Here are just some of the ways I use Google Forms in my classroom.

Two Easy Tips to Prepare Your Class for a Sub


Do you dread writing sub plans?  I know Ido! Do you dread coming back from a day out of your classroom and reading the note from the sub about your students' behavior?  Yup, I did.  I can't help you with sub plans today but I can help you with ways to help your students behave better for a guest teacher in your classroom.

I have TWO easy tips for you!

A SIMPLE Way to Effectively Manage Your Workstations!


I use workstations (or centers, stations - whatever YOU call them) daily in my Language Arts and Math blocks and several times a week in my Science block.  I've tried MANY ways to manage my rotations and I will probably continue to try different ways.  Every year is different and every group of students is different.  Couple that with the changing demands of your curriculum or administration whatever worked last year, may not work this year!  It always takes me a few weeks at the beginning of the year to set up my groups, my stations, and my plans for stations.  I am 8 weeks into the school year and I finally found a rotation schedule that works for my class this year.

I'm lucky to have a 2 hour Language Arts block (and I have an additional 45-minute writing block earlier in the day).  I start with a read aloud, a 5-minute reading skill of the day and then a 20 minute (or so) mini-lesson. We then break out for three 20 minute station rotations.  I have 5 workstations:  Vocabulary, Grammar/Writing, Computer, Independent Reading, and Teacher Table.  Most groups get to each station twice in a week, including my Teacher Table, except for my lowest group - I meet with them every day. We do 5 days of rotations one week, then 4 days of rotations the following week since we are on a biweekly testing schedule.  Usually, my Friday workstations are for catching up on unfinished activities and doing some extension activities based on the skills we are working on or reviewing.

Here's what my Monday rotation looks like:

I project my rotations on my board so that we all know where everyone is supposed to be and I've embedded a timer so that we stay on schedule.  I created my slides in Google Slides by inserting a table with the number of columns I need for my workstation plus one and the number of rows with the number of rotations plus one - in my case 6 columns by 4 rows.  I create my groups on the first slide then I just copy and paste to add them to the correct rotations on the following days.  It's easy to edit the groups (and I change them frequently based on student needs and the skill we are working on).  I have inserted a timer on my slide by clicking on "Insert" and then "Video" and searching for a timer on YouTube.  Just type  "20-minute timer" (or whatever time increment you would like to use) in the YouTube search bar and several options will come up for you. The one I use has a 5-second countdown timer before it starts and then has an annoying buzzer at the end that my students love!  Since it is YouTube, I recommend that you try the timer (fast forward through several points) to make sure there are no surprises! I size the timer to fit, then copy and paste it onto all of the slides.

And today is your lucky day!  You can make your own Weekly Reading Rotations by grabbing this link!  This link will force you to make a copy of my file so that you can edit the slides for your own needs! If you do choose to use it, I'd love for you to come back and share in the comments how it worked for you! Enjoy.

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